Andreas Harsono


Country: Indonesia

Andreas Harsono has covered Indonesia for Human Rights Watch since 2008. He has reported for The Jakarta Post, Bangkok’s Nation and Kuala Lumpur’s Star, and edited Pantau, a magazine on journalism in Jakarta. His book Race, Islam and Power: Ethnic and Religious Violence in Post-Suharto Indonesia was published in 2019 by Monash University.

Andreas Harsono telah meliput Indonesia untuk Human Rights Watch sejak 2008. Ia telah melaporkan untuk The Jakarta Post, Nation dari Bangkok dan Star dari Kuala Lumpur, serta menyunting Pantau, sebuah majalah tentang jurnalisme di Jakarta. Bukunya Race, Islam and Power: Ethnic and Religious Violence in Post-Suharto Indonesia telah diterbitkan pada 2019 oleh Monash University.

Appearing in

Main Program | Rise of the Tiger

Indonesia is Southeast Asia’s largest economy and the 16th largest in the world. By 2030, it’s predicted to be the fourth largest in the world. What will it take to …


Main Program | Islam Today

According to nonpartisan fact tank Pew Research Center, in the second half of this century Muslims will likely surpass Christians as the world’s largest religious group. From fractious headlines to …


Main Program | Andreas Harsono: Race, Islam and Power

Andreas Harsono has covered Indonesia for Human Rights Watch since 2008. His new book Race, Islam and Power: Ethnic and Religious Violence in Post-Suharto Indonesia is the result of his …


Main Program | Weapons of Mass Distortion

Indonesia has 150 million internet users and 800,000 hoax-distributing websites, according to the Ministry of Communication and Information Technology. In a system swimming with fake news, what is the relationship …


Special Event | Front Line, Front Page

Whether reporting from far flung locales or the world’s trouble spots, telling stories of tragedy or triumph, the work of a foreign correspondent is never dull. We’ve managed to pin …


Book Launch | The Day Hope and History Rhymed in East Timor and Other East Timor Stories

This lively collection was published to coincide with the 20th anniversary of East Timor’s improbable Brexit from Indonesia. It includes wry accounts of Dili traffic, roosters and motley characters, but …